From Asheville Citizen-Times…

 

Jake Quinn says his main job when he umpires baseball games as a volunteer for North Asheville Little League is to ensure each team is treated fairly. A lawsuit in which Quinn is a plaintiff could alter the rules of the game in elections in North Carolina and across the country, dramatically curbing the ability of state legislators to draw political boundaries every 10 years to favor their political party.

A separate case may result in new district lines for several legislative races in central and eastern North Carolina. This would increase the odds that Democrats either take control of the state General Assembly or at least win enough seats to end Republicans’ ability to pass laws without Gov. Roy Cooper’s approval. If Quinn’s side loses its case, the GOP would probably continue to dominate the state’s delegation to the U.S. House for at least a few more years and possibly many to come. If the challenge to legislative races is unsuccessful, that would make it harder for Democrats to make significant inroads on Republicans’ control of the legislature.

The share of votes for Democratic and Republican candidates for the U.S. House in North Carolina has not translated into comparable shares of the 13 congressmen the state elects. This chart shows the share of the all votes for House seats each party’s candidates got in recent elections and the number of seats its candidates won.

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Below are charts derived from the article. “The share of votes for Democratic and Republican candidates for the U.S. House in North Carolina has not translated into comparable shares of the 13 congressmen the state elects. This chart shows the share of the all votes for House seats each party’s candidates got in recent elections and the number of seats its candidates won.”

 

Lawsuits could change the rules in North Carolina politics, balance of power in Raleigh

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